Olivia Molly Rogers reveals why she quit drinking for good after a ‘big night’

Former Miss Universe Australia Olivia Molly Rogers has told how anxiety and silly arguments with her husband led her to quit drinking for good – and she didn’t even indulge in a glass of champagne on his wedding day.

Since she started drinking as a teenager, the 29-year-old model said she often passed out for half the night and woke up riddled with ‘debilitating’ anxiety and a feeling of dread which sometimes persisted for three days.

“They say drinking alcohol is like pouring fuel on an open flame if you’re anxious and that’s definitely what I’ve experienced,” the Melbourne-born bride revealed on TikTok.

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Former Miss Universe Australia Olivia Molly Rogers has revealed how anxiety and silly fights with husband Justin Mckeon led her to quit drinking for good

The former beauty queen hasn't had an <a class=alcoholic drink for more than ten months, having first quit for a week” class=”blkBorder img-share” style=”max-width:100%” />

The former beauty queen hasn’t had an alcoholic drink for more than ten months, having first quit for a week

The speech therapist, who was crowned Miss Universe Australia in 2017, said drinking has also led to “stupid” fights with partner Justin Mckeone.

The part-time model recently shared snaps from her wedding on Instagram, noting that it was “the perfect day” which started with both of her parents walking her down the aisle.

“I’ve never seen Justin smile like he did when I walked down the aisle (tears in my eyes), it’s a moment I’ll never forget.”

The couple’s relationship has gone from strength to strength since Ms Rogers decided to quit drinking on May 1, 2021.

She even made the decision not to drink on her wedding day and says the celebration was

She even made the decision not to drink on her wedding day and says the celebration was ‘perfect’ – she is pictured here being walked down the aisle by her parents

The former pageant queen pictured here in her second wedding dress of the evening initially meant her booze ban was short but found she was better off without the drink

The former pageant queen pictured here in her second wedding dress of the evening initially meant her booze ban was short but found she was better off without the drink

“It was just the straw that broke the camel’s back,” she said news.com.au.

“It happened too often and when I thought back to that day when I was hungover, the common denominator here is alcohol.”

While Olivia originally planned to take only a few weeks of alcohol, she quickly noticed the many benefits of a sober lifestyle.

The blonde beauty said she no longer suffers from headaches, sleeps better and notices an improvement in her mental health almost instantly.

Her physical strength has also improved, with Olivia feeling “stronger and more efficient” in her workouts after just two weeks in the dry.

Since going dry in May, the blonde beauty (pictured) said she no longer suffered from headaches, slept better and noticed an improvement in her mental health almost instantly

Since going dry in May, the blonde beauty (pictured) said she no longer suffered from headaches, slept better and noticed an improvement in her mental health almost instantly

While Olivia originally planned to take only a few weeks of alcohol, she quickly noticed the many benefits of a sober lifestyle.

While Olivia originally planned to take only a few weeks of alcohol, she quickly noticed the many benefits of a sober lifestyle.

What to expect when you stop drinking

Within 12 to 24 hours: Detoxification begins and blood sugar normalizes.

During this time, you may experience withdrawal symptoms, including sweating, anxiety, depression, and insomnia.

In a week: Sleep quality should improve and you should start feeling more energized and hydrated.

In two weeks: Weight loss can begin with the removal of hidden calories in alcohol.

Within three to four weeks: Blood pressure stabilizes.

Source: dry July

She has since embraced sobriety as a long-term lifestyle choice and encourages others to reconsider their relationship with alcohol, just as she has.

Olivia thinks alcoholism education is too black and white.

‘[It’s like] either you drink and you drink well or you’re an alcoholic and you shouldn’t drink and there’s no middleman, but that’s not true,’ she said.

“I think there are so many gray areas that are not talked about, especially in Australia.”

Olivier is not alone.

The Adelaide model (pictured) has embraced sobriety as a long-term lifestyle choice and encourages others to reconsider their relationship with alcohol, just as she did

The Adelaide model (pictured) has embraced sobriety as a long-term lifestyle choice and encourages others to reconsider their relationship with alcohol, just as she did

Recent figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics reveal that more than a quarter of Australians – 28.9% – mostly abstain from alcohol, while a further 9.5% drink less than at the same time. last year.

Over the past four years, the number of former drinkers in Australia has risen from 1.5 million to 1.9 million.

The growing sober scene is largely fueled by hordes of Instagram influencers touting the benefits of their alcohol-free lifestyle online, and the hospitality industry is taking notice.

Australia’s first-ever alcohol-free bar opened in Melbourne on May 1 last year and offers a menu of over 100 beers, wines and alcohol-free cocktails for teetotallers.

Australia's first-ever non-alcoholic bottle bar and store (pictured) opened in Melbourne on May 1

Australia’s first-ever non-alcoholic bottle bar and store (pictured) opened in Melbourne on May 1

Brunswick Aces Bar is designed for anyone who lives or entertains an understated lifestyle

Brunswick Aces Bar is designed for anyone who lives or entertains an understated lifestyle

Brunswick Aces in Brunswick East, six kilometers north of the CBD, was designed for anyone living or planning a sober lifestyle.

Brand manager Stuart Henshall said the “inconsistent” stocking of non-alcoholic products in traditional bars has led to a standoff between venues and consumers.

“People don’t know where to stock what – sites say we don’t stock non-alcoholic options because no one asks for them, but sober consumers say they don’t go out because of lack of those options,” Mr. Henshall previously said. Daily Mail Australia.

“We wanted to create a place where people come and also prove to traditional venues that there is a demand for non-alcoholic products.”

CEO and co-founder Stephen Lawrence said he had been “inundated with messages” from sober drinkers from Perth to Sydney, as well as overseas.

For help with alcohol and addiction issues, you can contact Rotating servicesor one of many other services availabletalk to your GP, local health department or call a helpline.

Qualified telephone counselors are available in all Australian states and territories.

About Michael Brafford

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