Pinot Noir grapes are the first to be harvested since the Palos Verdes Peninsula became an official wine region – Daily Breeze

Harvesting Pinot Noir grapes is nothing new to Jim York.

But pulling in the lush, deep purple fruit had special meaning for York’s Catalina View wines this week: they were the first grapes harvested since the Palos Verdes Peninsula was designated by the federal government as the official wine region last month. .

  • Catalina View Wines on the Palos Verdes Peninsula began harvesting their Pinot Noir grapes on August 11 for wine production. In the photo, owner Jim York. (photo by Michael Hixon)

  • Catalina View Wines on the Palos Verdes Peninsula began harvesting their Pinot Noir grapes on August 11 for wine production. (photo by Michael Hixon)

  • Catalina View Wines on the Palos Verdes Peninsula began harvesting their Pinot Noir grapes on August 11 for wine production. (photo by Michael Hixon)

  • Catalina View Wines on the Palos Verdes Peninsula began harvesting their Pinot Noir grapes on August 11 for wine production. (photo by Michael Hixon)

  • Catalina View Wines on the Palos Verdes Peninsula began harvesting their Pinot Noir grapes on August 11 for wine production. (photo by Michael Hixon)

  • Catalina View Wines on the Palos Verdes Peninsula began harvesting their Pinot Noir grapes on August 11 for wine production. (photo by Michael Hixon)

  • Catalina View Wines on the Palos Verdes Peninsula began harvesting their Pinot Noir grapes on August 11 for wine production. (photo by Michael Hixon)

  • Catalina View Wines on the Palos Verdes Peninsula began harvesting their Pinot Noir grapes on August 11 for wine production. In the photo, owner Jim York. (photo by Michael Hixon)

York and his team began the harvest at 6 a.m. on Wednesday 11 August, the first step in the winemaking process.

“We expect to have six or seven tons of grapes,” York said. “We put them in a refrigerated truck at 42 degrees. The reason for keeping it cool like this is that it prevents the grapes from fermenting.

The grapes will reach Buellton around 6 a.m. Thursday, York said, where wine production will begin. After that, the labels will be stamped – for the first time – with “Palos Verdes Peninsula”.

The next harvest, said York, will be the Chardonnay grape. This will happen on Tuesday August 17th.

To be considered an American wine-growing area, the region must have geographic or climatic characteristics that separate it from surrounding areas and influence how grapes are grown, according to the US Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau. The Peninsula is now one of three wine regions in Los Angeles County with such a designation.

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